Living with the Rhone

Angling

By restoring natural habitats, increasing the flowrates in the natural branches of the Rhone and building fish passes, CNR is creating the conditions for enhancing fish fauna diversity. A partner of angling federations, CNR supports actions to initiate young children and develop this pastime.

peche-dans-le-rhone-secteur-de-grignyThe Upper Rhone, a privileged destination for angling

The increase of compensation water, the restoration of oxbows (very rich natural habitats), the preservation of the bypassed sections of the Rhone, and adapted fish management conducted in collaboration with angling federations, are giving good results. The Upper Rhone has become a destination of choice for keen anglers.

The strategy for migrating fish on the Lower Rhone

CNR actively participates in the strategy to help migrating fish to win back the Rhone. Started in 2009, this strategy is aimed at restoring fish continuity in the river, from the sea to the confluence of the Rhone with the Drôme (left bank) and the Eyrieux (right bank). For CNR, the strategy is concretised by the construction of fish passes on its structures. Part of the Plan Rhône, cette stratégie regroupe,and in partnership with the European Union and the French government, the Rhône-Alpes, Provence-Alpes-Côte-d’Azur et Languedoc-Roussillon, the ONEMA (National Water and Wetlands Agency), the association Migrateurs Rhône Méditerranée and the Rhone Mediterranean Corsica Water Agency.

For example, the restoration of the ecological continuity of the Lower Gardon, a tributary of the Rhone, favours the migration of endangered species (eel, shad, lamprey).

Support for angling federation

peche-dans-le-rhone-secteur-de-caderousseIn the framework of its Missions in the General Interest, CNR has forged partnerships with all the angling federations of the Rhône Valley. CNR provides technical and financial aid to their projects, for example, to create specific angling circuits (grayling, predators) in the oxbows and side channels, natural habitats of extraordinary quality. These circuits boost tourism relating to angling. Furthermore, the construction of angling pontoons accessible to reduced mobility persons has opened up this practice for a new public. Lastly, Angling and Nature workshops make schoolchildren aware of natural aquatic habitats and the need to preserve biodiversity.

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3 species of migrating fish in the Rhone are endangered

Diadromous migrating fish have to migrate between freshwater and the sea to fulfil their biological cycle: :

- The eel migrates to rivers to grow and reach adulthood before returning to the ocean to reproduce. The eel population is now only 10 to 30% of what it used to be.

- The shad and lamprey hatch in freshwater and live a certain time in rivers / or estuaries where they grow and adapt to increasing salinity. They then migrate to ocean habitats where they reach adulthood, before returning to rivers to reproduce.

These migrating fish therefore use several river habitats (spawning grounds, nurseries, sheltering areas).They require good connectivity between these habitats that can be several tens of kilometres apart to complete their biological cycle. The degradation and even disappearance of these habitats, as well as the dams and weirs that severely limit connectivity in large rivers, have contributed to reducing populations of migrating fish and the disappearance of certain species.

G.Guillaud

Gérard Guillaud
President of the Fédération de Savoie pour la pêche et la Protection du milieu aquatique.

The Upper Rhone was a legendary destination, much appreciated for fly fishing for grayling and it is a reputed site for predators such as the pike. (...) It has now become a choice destination for angling.

 

On the same subject

  • What are the Missions in the General Interest ?

    See more
  • Water resources and biodiversity

    See more

Key figures

All the departmental angling federations of the Rhone Valley issue 230,000 angling permits every year.

3 species of migrating fish in the Rhone are endangered

Diadromous migrating fish have to migrate between freshwater and the sea to fulfil their biological cycle: :

- The eel migrates to rivers to grow and reach adulthood before returning to the ocean to reproduce. The eel population is now only 10 to 30% of what it used to be.

- The shad and lamprey hatch in freshwater and live a certain time in rivers / or estuaries where they grow and adapt to increasing salinity. They then migrate to ocean habitats where they reach adulthood, before returning to rivers to reproduce.

These migrating fish therefore use several river habitats (spawning grounds, nurseries, sheltering areas).They require good connectivity between these habitats that can be several tens of kilometres apart to complete their biological cycle. The degradation and even disappearance of these habitats, as well as the dams and weirs that severely limit connectivity in large rivers, have contributed to reducing populations of migrating fish and the disappearance of certain species.